Search Back Issues

Looking for a specific article from Mark magazine? Type your query in the search box to find in which issue it was published. Search by author, architect, building type, city, country or section of the magazine.

Back Issues

Mark 66

Mark 66

We’re floating on cloud nine with all the excitement of the latest issue of Mark. Issue #66 finally sees the realization of several long-awaited projects and, we assure you, it has been well worth the wait!

Cross Section
Next Architects; 5+1AA; Nathan Crowley/Zach Grobler; Space Group; Studio Gang; Infographic; AL_A; Buchner Bründler; Cláudio Vilarinho

Perspective: Music Venues
• Toyo Ito’s National Taichung Theatre in Taiwan is a stunning building, with rough spots
• In spite of setbacks, Jacques Herzog and Pierre De Meuron were finally able to open their Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg
• The National Music Centre by Allied Works is a catalyst for a blighted Calgary

Long Section
• Coop Himmeb(l)au creates an impressive showcase in the Chinese city of Shenzen
• Stuio Fuksas’s Convention Centre in Rome features a free-shaped auditorium, floating in a glass box
• When they design buildings, Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects have trees in mind
• The Longquan International Bamboo Architecture Biennale in Baoxi, China, is both an architecture exhibition and the creation of a community
• Lily Jencks teamed up with Nathanael Dorent to build her own retreat in a corner of the family-owned country estate in Scotland
• Smart Design Studio turned a house for an art lover in Sydney into a work of art in itself
• Search transforms a former farmhouse into a home for a family two owls and a few goats
• Robert Meyer talks about publishing, processes and the importance of being pragmatic

Some articles from this issue

 

Float around inside Studio Fuksas' the Cloud

ROME – The Rome Convention Centre and hotel, which opened to the public at the end of October 2016, now invites you to a 360-degrees experience of the interior.

 

Out Now: Mark #66 – Feb/Mar 2017

We're floating on cloud nine with all the excitement of the latest issue of Mark. Issue #66 finally sees the realisation of several long-awaited projects and it has been well worth the wait!

Mark 65

Mark 65

Mark #65 sees the realisation of the highly anticipated Port House in Antwerp by Zaha Hadid Architects. Are interventions always so dramatic?

Cross Section
Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Gensler; Fujiwaramuro; Nio; JDS; PLAYstudio/YES; V+; Idom; SO-IL/Bohlin Cywinski Jackson; Infographic; Michael Sorkin Studio; Studio Prototype; Tomohiro Hata; DRAA; Martin Dubeau/Jonathan Jacques-Belletête; Freelon Group/Adjaya Associates/Davis Brody Bond; Aranza de Ariño

Perspective: Blaibach
Peter Haimerl never planned to reinvent the village of Blaibach. It happened gradually. House by house.

Long Section
• Zaha Hadid Architects’ porthouse reflects the ambitions of Antwero’s harbour
• Keiichi Kiriyama builds houses like forests. Interior trees help to connect the inhabitants to nature
• Father and son duo Marcio and Gabriel Kogan team up with architecture photographer Pedro Kok and filmmaker Lea Van Steen for a series of short films featuring some of the houses they designed over the years
• Edouard François plants a nature-inclusive tower in Paris
• Building high-rises in wood is becoming increasingly widespread. In Stockholm, plans are being made for a 34-storey apartment building
• Fuhrimann Hächler built a house in Olten that pays homage to Le Corbusier’s principles of modern architecture
• 6a’s studio for fashion and art photographer Juergen Teller lends itself for a variety of photo shoots
• Students on the University of Colorado Denver’s design-build programme creates a series of huts in perfect harmony with their forest location
• Amateur Architecture Studio designed houses for the people of the Chinese village of Wencun. They don’t like them, but the tourists are happy to stay there
• Joseph Giovannini talks about reading and writing, eccentric architects and about the Deep South, where people are still friendly

Some articles from this issue

 

A concrete tent creates a space void of domestic 'extras'

OAXACA – A tiny house designed as a holiday home for a couple in Mexico is one of young architect Aranza de Ariño's first professional projects.

 

Students receive vertical learning in Manhattan

NEW YORK – The Vagelos Education Center by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Gensler features a 14-storey cascade for informal study.

Mark 64

Mark 64

The age-old issue of housing supply and the decade-old issue of mass-image consumption. Two topics that have affected the architectural industry separately but if looked at through a different lens, maybe a connection could be made.

Cross Section
Andra Matin; Dice; Terreneuve; Sean Hargreaves; OMA; Jamie xx; Woods Bagot; Next; Theo Deutinger; Code; Radko Květ; Vazio; Dorell Ghotmeh Tane; WMR; Gregory Barrett

Perspective: Modular Housing
• nArchitects :Stacking welded modular housing units like Lego bricks
• Shedkm: Prefabrication that allows for customization
• Finch Buildings: Developing a modular, eco-friendly strategy for the housing market

Long Section
• Peter Grundmann engages in long relationships with his clients
• Gens wants to let the architect’s signature disappear
• Is there still room for architectural photographers in a world of digital cameras and online publications?
• Z4Z4 Architects astonishes with a house that contains countless quotations
• BIG’s first New York apartment building is a formal experiment with plainly appointed units
• Spaceworkers’ latest two projects share one feature: they guide their users by organizing space in clever ways
• Patrick Seguin restores and sells demountable homes designed by Jean Prouvé.
• Like many museums, SFMOMA and Tate Modern just keep growing. But the art and the visitors are more important than appearances
• Henri Borduin's newest house was made with a lot of patience and personal carpentry
• Ensamble Studio created three concrete structures for the newly opened Tippet Rise Art Center in Montana
• Roberto Cremascoli talks about curiosity, storytelling, and the hysteria surrounding exhibition catalogues

Some articles from this issue

 

Roof-top pool cools locally crafted concrete-poured residence

BELO HORIZONTE – Vazio uses a rooftop water basin as a passive cooling system for the rooms under it.

 

Is architectural photography dead?

Architectural photographer Duccio Malagamba comments on recent developments in his profession.

Mark 63

Mark 63

Something is happening. Although coming from different corners of the globe, our contributors and protagonists seem to share a vision.

Cross Section
ANMA; Austigard; Christ & Gantenbein; Coldplay; Max Núñez; Theo Deutinger; Mamm Design; Mind; Arkitektur+Development

Perspective: The Japanese Renovation Movement
• Jo Nagasaka: Making a career out of renovating houses
• 403 Architecture Dajiba: Offering an alternative to the raze-and-build mentality that's popular in Japan
• Shindo Masuda+ Katsuhisa Otsubo: Looking for ways to improve what's already there

Long Section
• SelgasCano's temporary pavilion for a museum in Denmark gained a second life in Kenya as a school
• Gabriel Huerta designed a university building in Mexico that connects with the community
• On the occasion of the 15th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, Mark talked to the people behind the scenes
• Patrick Berger adds a chapter to the turbulent history of the Forum des Halles in Paris
• Aires Mateus's EDP headquarters in Lisbon is wrapped in a structure of columns and beams that protects the interior from the sun
• Yasser Elsheshtawy talks about the glitzy, non-contextual and controversial bubble development called Dubaization
• Liu Jiakun's business complex in Chengdu is somewhere between a Chinese quadrangle and a European-style perimeter block
• Christ & Gantenbein's expressive extension of the Landesmuseum in Zurich responds to the picturesque roof landscape of the existing building
• Tino Schaedler talks about the ephemeral world of Equals
• Mario Cucinella based his office building in Accra on the idea of imperfection
• Malkit Shoshan is fascinated by the way countries exercise their power

Some articles from this issue

 

Arkitektur + Development exploits the raw beauty of abandoned factories

NORRKÖPING – Anyone used to the image culture in contemporary architecture can pinpoint this project as a former industrial area that is now undergoing gentrification.

 

Mind Architects Collective designs an office that feels friendly and dutiful

BISCHOFSHEIM – Most stereotypes tend to have a bad connotation, but not in this case.

Mark 62

Mark 62

Realisation while flipping through the pages of our new issue: architecture is diverse. And so is this issue of Mark. The world is full of contradictions.

Cross Section
Vardehaugen; Suppose; MVRDV; Roger Bundschuh; Valerio Dewalt Train Associates; Austin Maynard; El Equipo Mazzanti; Neutelings Riedijk; KWK Promes/ Robert Konieczny; Snorre Stinessen; AZPML; Kumiko Inui; Dorte Mandrup; Takeshi Hosaka

Perspective: Refugee Shelters
• Produced with the support of the Ikea Foundation, the Better Shelter home naturally comes in a cardboard box
• The Maggie shelter aims to supply the 'missing link' in the refugee crisis
• Tom Newby explains why the architect's vision of the emergency shelter is all too often the answer to a non-existent question

Long Section
• Vo Trong Nghia doesn't want to work only for the rich
• JDS mixes offices, a kindergarten and a youth hostel in one sculptural form
• Moon Hoon's all-seeing sci-fi tower crowns a Korean courtyard complex
• Iroje KHM built a house for a pilot and his family
• Dominique Coulon is a blueprint believerng
• As-If Architects of Berlin extends a former Nazi barracks to house Zeppelin University in Friedrichshafen
• Guedes Cruz makes bling meet brutalism on Portugal's rugged Atlantic coast
• AL_A's Bangkok Central Embassy merges a seven-storey retail podium and a 36-storey hotel tower
• Billie Faircloth of Kieran Timberlake talks about research, which she defines as 'to search and search again'
• Gustav Peichl has made his mark in print as well as buildings and at 88, he's still an expert in subversion

Some articles from this issue

 

Photographer Steve King shows aerial views of Manshausen's arctic architecture

MANSHAUSEN – A visual follow-up on Snorre Stinessen's Sea Cabins which we published in Mark #62situated on a blissful and privately owned Norwegian island.

 

Out Now: Mark #62 – Jun/Jul 2016

Realisation while flipping through the pages of our new issue: architecture is diverse. And so is this issue of Mark. The world is full of contradictions.

Mark 61

Mark 61

In Mark 61, we take a look at how architecture can influence government activity with a sneak-peek into architectural office XML's forthcoming book Parliaments.

Cross Section
Gonzalo Mardones; Drake / Director X; Front Office Tokyo; Bethesda Game Studios; Von M; Encore Heureux; Koizumi Sekkei; Orange; TNA; Theo Deutinger; Staab; Donis; Mjölk; A-cero; Suppose; XML / Jurgen Bey

Perspective: Parliaments
XML has been conducting an international research project on spaces of political congregation.

Long Section
• Fernando Menis's cultural complex in Toruń echoes both the local medieval architecture and the rugged volcanic landscape of his own Canarian homeland
• Rudy Ricciotti's Rivesaltes Memorial Museum is an eloquent epitaph on the darker episodes of modern history
• Mass Design Group helps to reduce Malawi's maternal mortality rate
• Ken Takahashi’s two new houses illustrate his concept of 'smallness'
• Marc Koehler conjures up a pair of spatially adventurous houses
• Paul De Meyer designed an Antwerp penthouse in the early 1970s that has recently been photographed for the very first time
• L3P ingeniously fits three apartments into an old half-timbered house
• Fránek Architects' Sky Walk is less about the view and more about upstaging the dramatic mountain landscape
• Ghilardi+Hellsten realized a floating pedestrian path that snakes over a Norwegian island
• Stig L. Andersson's book collection inspires the concepts and methods on which he bases his studio

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #61 – Apr/May 2016

In Mark #61, we take a look at how architecture can influence government activity with a sneak-peek into architectural office XML's forthcoming book Parliaments.

Mark 60

Mark 60

In Mark #60, we take a leisurely train journey across the Netherlands and stop at the nation’s upgraded train stations along the way.

Cross Section
Diener & Diener / Martin Steinmann; Mecanoo; AP Atelier; MVRDV; ARX; Atelier Tekuto; Schmidt Hammer Lassen; Degelo; SUB; MX_SI; WMR; Shift; Brenac & Gonzalez; Meili Peter; Lumo

Perspective: New Train Stations in the Netherlands
• Benthem Crouwel, Meyer & Van Schooten Architecten and West 8 have given Rotterdam an iconic city gate
• UNStudio’s station in Arnhem is all about the spectacular ‘twist’ that ties together the pedestrian flows
• Koen van Velsen’s station in Breda wants to be part of the city
• Interview with Jan Benthem, who worked on four of the six major new stations in the Netherlands

Long Section
• Gilbartolomé used local craftsmanship to connect a villa to both the mountains and the sea
• KWK Promes takes the weekend house to an upper level
• The new Hollandic Water Line is an ingenious, eighteenth-century defence system that has had new life breathed into it by the Waterliniemuseum Fort bij Vechten
• Malcom Reading organizes architecture competitions. ‘We’re looking for a building that will be forever linked with the moment a career was made’
• Peter Haimerl renovated and remodelled a small farm close to Munich
• Alex McDowell talks about his practice of world building and his first steps into architecture and urban planning in the real world
• Odile Decq managed to realize a museum in Nanjing over Skype
• TNA’s latest house in Tokyo is closely linked to the street
• Reinier de Graaf talks about the role of reading and writing within the architect’s office

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #60 – Feb/Mar 2016

In Mark #60, we take a leisurely train journey across the Netherlands and stop at the nation’s upgraded train stations along the way.

Mark 59

Mark 59

Mark #59 explores the exciting architectural ancestry of eastern Germany, once home of the nation's famous reformer, Martin Luther.

Cross Section
NAP / Hiroshi Nakamura; 2b; Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei; CtrlG / 51-1; Filip Dujardin; Diener & Diener; Jorge Suso; Elding Oscarson; Studio Prototype; Espen Surnevik; Robertneun; CF Møller; Tomohiro Hata; Raumzeit; Office O; Studio Archea; Lorenzo Castro; Bloot; Tham & Videgård

Perspective
In the eastern Germany region of Saxony-Anhalt, three towns – nicknamed Lutherstadt or Luther city – are sites of significant events surrounding Martin Luther's birth, life, work and death. All three towns have constructed new museums or visitor centres to commemorate the famous reformer.

Long Section
• Mad advocates a merger of architecture and landscape
• Toyo Ito’s interest in a renewed relationship with nature is reflected in cultural centre Media Cosmos
• Carvalho Araújo completed two houses that are dug into the ground
• Ila Bêka and Louise Lemoine show how buildings can have an impact on the way you live
• Marte Marte’s projects pay homage to the castles and lofty towers that fascinated the architects as children
• Rolf Bruggink and Niek Wagemans renovated a coach house using demolition materials harvested from an old shed
• Sanaa designed spaces for public gatherings in the form of a meandering river
• Małgorzata Szczurek, Przemek Dębowski and Magdalena Hajduk-Dębowska introduce contemporary architecture to the Polish audience

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #59 – Dec 2015/Jan 2016

Nature meets culture in the December/January issue, Step into the Madhouse.

Mark 58

Mark 58

Mark #58 jumps to Japan where we take a look at how Jun Igarashi makes the most of small spaces.

Cross Section
Terroir / Kim Utzon; Monadnock; Diego Arraigada; Dekleva Gregorič; Buro Bill / Zampone; Tale of Tales; Taichi Mitsuya; Rojkind; N/A; Zaha Hadid; Atelier Riri; Theo Deutinger; D’Houndt+Bajart; NE-AR

Perspective
The former Entrepôt Macdonald – the longest building in Paris – now houses shops, offices, schools and over 1,100 dwellings. Fifteen architects collaborated on the renovation: Xaveer De Geyter; Floris Alkemade; Christian de Portzamparc; Nicolas Michelin; Brenac Gonzalez; Gigon Guyer; Stéphane Maupin; Julien De Smedt; Habiter Autrement; Hondelatte Laporte; L’AUC; Marc Mimram; François Leclercq; Odile Decq; and Kengo Kuma.

Long Section
• Jems Architects transformed the grounds of a former coal mine into a congress centre
• Jean Nouvel’s Philharmonie de Paris is an asset to the city, despite the scandals surrounding its construction
• A floating hotel in Amsterdam has been pimped with five new rooms, each designed by a different architect
• Michael Maltzan’s One Santa Fe merges enormousness with intimacy
• Jun Igarashi’s three most recently completed houses on the Japanese island of Hokkaido are different yet alike
• Ryder Henry creates model cities that combine contemporary architecture with science-fiction motifs
• Zaha Hadid returns to her roots at Oxford University
• Odile Decq’s extension to an art collector’s manor house serves as guest lodgings with a view of the surroundings
• Benjamin Dillenburger and Michael Hansmeyer make 3D-printed objects with hyper-elaborate surfaces
• Adamo-Faiden’s Casa Fernández allows its occupants to enjoy the scents and shadows of Belgrano
• Ricardo Devesa talks about his fetishistic desire to collect books and the future of architectural publishing

Some articles from this issue

 

Fifteen architecture firms gave Paris’ longest building a new lease of life

PARIS – A large-scale urban renewal project in Paris is nearing completion with various architecture firms collaborating on the renovation.

 

Out Now: Mark #58 – Oct/Nov 2015

Mark #58 jumps to Japan where we take a look at how Jun Igarashi makes the most of small spaces. Although Igarashi himself states that he has 'no style', there seems to be a similar architectural …

Mark 57

Mark 57

When it comes to Expo 2015, Milan seems to be unaffected by the economic crisis.

Cross Section
Herzog & de Meuron; Jo Jinman; Teodor Javanaud Emdén; Cobe; Naf; Ai Weiwei – Bart visser; Sheppard Robson; OMA; Mark Digby; MAKS; Piotr Brzoza – Projekt Praga; Form – Kiouichi Kimura; Thomas Schütte; Gafpa

Perspective
• Expo 2015 is an extravagant temple to consumption, waste and the corporate dollar
• Oma’s Prada Foundation introduces culture into a scruffy, peripheral neighborhood of Milan
• David Chipperfield is not happy about Mudec, but the museum opened to visitors nonetheless
• Baukuh provided the façades of the Casa Della Memoria with images from the institute’s archives

Long Section
• Schmidt Hammer Lassen’s new public library in Aarhus plays a key role in the redevelopment of the city’s waterfront
• Schmidt Hammer Lassen’s Malmö concert hall was inspired by the traditional Swedish folkhuset
• Josep Ferrando designed a house within a house in the Medieval core of the Spanish town of Sant Cugat del Valles
• Eric Owen Moss realizes a long delayed project atop a parking garage in Culver City
• Arup helps to enhance sound and protect people’s hearing
• Rachel Melvald is a psychotherapist who offers her services to architects and their clients
• Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s Broad Museum animates LA’s Cultural axis
• Mass Design Group built a hospital for cholera patients atop a water-treatment facility in Port-au-Prince
• Atelier ST takes a fresh approach to each ‘one-off’ project
• Stefano Boeri finds inspiration in children’s drawings

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #57 – Aug/Sep 2015

When it comes to Expo 2015, Milan seems to be unaffected by the economic crisis. Giovanna Dunmall describes the event as ‘an extravagant temple to consumption, waste and the corporate dollar’.

Mark 56

Mark 56

Mark #56 delves into the seemingly contradictory subject of architectural preservation in Los Angeles.

Cross Section
Oving; Coop Himmelb(l)au; Van Noten; De Baes; Mount Fuji; Luis Pancorbo; José de Villar; Carlos Chacón; Inés Martin Robles; University of California Students; ABDR; Mecanoo; Benthem Crouwel; Graber Pulver; WMR; Tadao Ando; Taichi Mitsuya; Unemori; Hertl; Manuelle Gautrand; Durbach Block Jaggers; BVN

Perspective: Preservation in Los Angeles
• Michael LaFetra buys modernist homes, restores them and puts them back on the market
• Developer Wayne Ratkovich has been preserving and finding creative uses for the architectural heritage of Los Angeles over the past four decades
• Michael Webb recounts how he teamed up with neighbours and persuaded a developer to defer to a modern classic in West LA

Long Section
• The red-tiled Ya Chang Art Center is at the core of a Shanghai industrial site renovated by Atelier Deshaus
• BIG, headed by Bjarke Ingels, recently updated and extended the secondary school in Hellerup that Ingels attended as a teenager
• Engineer Dennis Poon explains the structural design of the Shanghai Tower, currently the second tallest building in the world
• The occupants of six apartments in Alterlaa, Harry Glück’s 1970s housing complex in Vienna, talk about living in the Austrian architect’s high-rise block
• The university building that Heatherwick Studio completed in Singapore embodies collaborative learning while cleverly dealing with the tropical climate
• Marc Simmons of Front Inc. makes sure the architect’s design gets realized
• Working with university students in Brussels, photographer Maxime Delvaux explored the possibilities and limitations of architectural models
• UNStudio’s campus for the Singapore University of Technology and Design is easy to navigate and prompts chance encounters
• The film Tomorrowland was released in May in theatres across the globe. We spoke with two of the people responsible for designing and visualizing the architecture of the eponymous utopian city
• There’s nary a book in sight at Snøhetta’s Ryerson University Student Learning Centre
• The Guardian’s Oliver Wainwright talks about architecture criticism in the 21st century

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #56 – Jun/Jul 2015

Mark #56 delves into the seemingly contradictory subject of architectural preservation in Los Angeles.

Mark 55

Mark 55

Mark #55 goes off the radar, featuring a handful of lengthy, painstaking efforts to restore remote, abandoned villages in Southern Europe.

Cross Section
Bona-Lemercier; Xavier Veilhan & Alexis Bertrand; Renato Rizzi; Nathan Crowley & Paul Franklin; BCHO; Baren Koolhaas; The Creative Assembly; Moshe Safdie; James Silverman; Theo Deutinger; Van Dongen-Koschuch; Davidclovers; Re-act Now; WMR

Perspective: Villages for Sale in Southern Europe
• Loural to Lisbon, Amares to Aldán, contributors Sanderyn Amsberg and Daniel Jauslin investigate Spanish and Portuguese ruins restored to liveable structures
• Amsberg continues on to Italy, where cavernous, impoverished, or otherwise prehistoric villages are given the luxury treatment

Long Section
• Inspired by a 1970s French cult film, Arno Brandlhuber takes a sledgehammer to dilapidated, concrete buildings in Krampnitz from the same period
• Kazuyasu Kochi’s ‘Apartment House’ turns the former into the latter, and slashes through the existing room grid with chromatic vibrance
• La Musée des Confluences by Coop Himmelb(l)au, an imposing new behemoth on the shores of Lyon, becomes a hub of multidisciplinary enlightenment
• David Benjamin channels biotechnology in luminous, ephemeral public installations
• The village of Soesterberg hosts Claus Van Wageningen Architects’ new National Military Museum of the Netherlands, where a singular, glass hangar casts transparency as a virtue
• Melbourne’s John Wardle Architects and Boston’s NADAAA form an unlikely duo in the conception of the new Melbourne School of Design, where flexible forms take on multiple architectural dimensions
• Didier Faustino, founder of Parisian firm Mésarchitecture, navigates a subversive intersection between art and architecture
• Camillo Botticini’s new abode etches gracefully into an incline of the Italian Alps
• A residence by L3P just outside of Zurich tiptoes on a small plot as impossibly as the image of a concrete grapevine
• Protoplasmic graphic designs take on epic proportions through Marc Fornes’ atelier Theverymany
• A vorticist hill of verdant balconies comprises Akihisa Hirata’s latest apartment complex, Kotoriku
• Kjetil Trædal Thorsen of Oslo firm Snøhetta discusses his preference for fictional over professional literature in our Bookmark feature

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #55 – Apr/May 2015

Mark #55 curates an assortment of restoration projects for abandoned villages in Southern Europe.

Mark 54

Mark 54

Usurpation is rampant in neutral Switzerland, where industrial zones left vacant by an increasingly service-oriented economy now host large-scale urban redevelopments.

Cross Section
Gehry Partners; Heatherwick Studio; D’Houndt+Bajart; UNStudio; Para-Project; TNA; Aedas; Lens°Ass; Kevin Thompson; Hiroshi Nakamura; Kraaijvanger; Andreas Martin-Löf; Toyo Ito; PPAG; Theo Deutinger; Takeshi Hosaka; Spark; Giancarlo Mazzanti; Fort; Moatti-Rivière; Gregory Barrett

Perspective: Two University Complexes in Switzerland
• Katharina Marchal delineates Swiss firm EM2N’s conversion of a Zurich milk-processing factory into two universities, apartments, and a museum
• In Juliette Soulez’s companion piece, a group of Swiss ateliers transform the Dreispitz industrial zone into a ‘Campus of the Arts’ for the Academy of Art and Design Basel

Long Section
• Lisbon-based OTO’s Fogo Natural Park Headquarters lies in ruins after the eruption of the island’s Pico do Fogo volcano
• The Cricoteka Centre in Cracow, Poland, a collaborative effort between local practices nsMoondstudio and Wizja, commemorates the life of Tadeusz Kantor on the Vistula waterfront
• Spanish firm SelgasCano and a group of 12 MIT architecture students discover the practical limitations of honest materials in constructing a health and education pavilion for the nomadic Turkana people
• Belgian artist Xavier Delory virtually vandalises Villa Savoye, among other digital alterations of architectural photography
• KWK Promes merge house and garden in the south Polish town of Katowice
&bullThe founders of French practice Antonini Darmon discuss a few of their social housing projects in Paris and Nantes
• Barcelona’s Garcés De Seta Bonet take a ‘museological’, highly brutalist approach to their three stations for the city’s still incomplete metro line
• Japanese structural engineer Jun Sato employs custom optimisation algorithms to design elaborate, porous frames
• In North Holland, native firm UNStudio design a hedonist villa with a ‘pinched’ plan, drawing the landscape into the house
• Dutch architect Marc Koehler wraps home around office for his artist mother’s abode and raises a summer residence from the dunes of Terschelling
• For a Bookmark feature, Harvard Graduate School of Design professor Rahul Mehrotra laments the decline of the library in his native India and offers a few book recommendations

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #54 – Feb/Mar 2015

In Mark #54, we analyse Switzerland's growing trend of urban redevelopment in vacant industrial zones.

 

Kraaijvanger's city council office pirouettes on its toes

UTRECHT – Dutch atelier consolidates Utrecht's city council offices into compact yet emotive structure.

Mark 53

Mark 53

In Mark #53, we survey American low-income housing from coast to coast.

Cross Section
Iroje KHM; Amorphe; Garrison; Heri&Salli; Tato; Cal Poly Pomona Architectural Design Studio; Atelier Zafari; Möhring; Henning Larsen; Koning Eizenberg; Theo Deutinger; GPY; MachineGames; Studio Prototype; Norisada Maeda; Lewicki Łatak; Morphosis; Züst Gübeli Gambetti; Tilch + Drexler; Alphaville; Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Perspective: Low-income Housing in the USA
• Michael Webb discusses the current state of low-income housing in the United States and looks at three case studies in California
• David Adjaye’s Sugar Hill slab, despite differing opinions on its appearance, gives the community a sense of worth
• Two American university programmes aim to make well-designed housing a universal norm – and all for €20,000 or less
• Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan designs buildings for homeless people in his city. Five of them tell their stories

Long Section
• MVRDV’s Markthal became an instant hit in Rotterdam with a little help from artist Arno Coenen
• In Japanese architecture office Be-Fun, project acquisition is just as important as architectural design. Tsuyoshi Shindo explains how they have navigated the economic crisis
• Müller Sigrist Architekten have designed a live-work complex in Zurich that’s a city in itself
• Jan Versweyveld is responsible for the scenography of the stage adaptation of The Fountainhead. He feels an affinity with protagonist Howard Roark
• Two Houses by Hiroshi Nakamura combine formal features with a concern for their inhabitants
• Elemental’s design for the Anacleto Angelini Innovation Center turns the conventional high-rise inside out
• Patkau Architects designed an angular house on a steep slope overlooking Whistler Valley
• Swiss publisher Lars Müller compares online reading to eating sushi and points out that there are many other wonderful things to eat

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #53 – Dec 2014/Jan 2015

In Mark #53, we survey American low-income housing from coast to coast.

Mark 52

Mark 52

It’s been five years since the Black Saturday bushfires caused devastation in Victoria, Australia. In Mark #52, we look back at what has been achieved by the Bushfires Home Service, an intiative for coordinating the efforts of volunteer architects who were offering help.

Cross Section
B-ILD; Vib; Morris Adjmi; Aedas; Studio Liu Kecheng; Stromae; Andra Matin; Mecanoo; ICD|ITKE|IIGS; Leth & Gori; Estudio Carmen Pinós; MAD; Bennett and Trimble; Theo Deutinger; Fuse Atelier; Bethem Crouwel; PFP; Caramel

Perspective: Black Saturday – Five Years Later
• Jennifer Calzini reflects on the Black Saturday bushfires that ravaged Victoria, Australia, in early 2009 and introduces the Bushfire Homes Service
• Albert Mo and James Coombe of Architects EAT talk about the difficulties they’ve encountered in bushfire zones
• Andy Wong of John Wardle Architects stresses the importance of letting the victims of fire make their own decision regarding the design of their new homes, free of any pressure
• Clare Cousins talks about her proposal and its built adaptation: the Chrismas Hills House
• Kim Irons of Irons McDuff Architecture thinks there are broader strategic issues beyond the design of fire-resistant homes
• Julie Firkin of Julie Firkin Architects talk about how her participation lead her to further investigate community centres that double as refuges
• Ninotschka Titchkosky of BVN Donovan Hill talks about rebuilding the Narbethong Community Hall

Long Section
• Estudio Barozzi Veiga in Sczcecin, Poland, design a new concert hall that echoes both Hanseatic architecture and projects by German expressionists
• Tham and Videgård in Sweden finished two country houses show the virtues of restraint
• Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei in Stuttgart, Germany, fuse past and present in their buildings
• Architecture BRIO in Mumbai, India, downscales domestic life for a collection of Barbie dolls
• 5468796 in Winnipeg, Canada, shakes up the local status quo by doing things their way
• Jochen Specht in Dornbirn, Austria, wraps his old house in a glass skin to give it a new lease of life
• Vhils in Lisbon, Portugal, uses carving techniques and explosives to give urban walls a new meaning
• Zaha Hadid Architects in Seoul, South Korea, designed a cavernous experience that could end up being hollow
• Ethel Baraona Pohl in Barcelona, Spain, believes in learning by doing, collective criticism and books that never end

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #52 – Oct/Nov 2014

In Mark #52, we reflect on the Bushfires Home Service: a response to 2009 Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria, Australia.

Mark 51

Mark 51

Articles on China’s building boom often highlight the property bubble, megalomaniac planners, governmental corruption and private graft, substandard building practices and the destruction of the nation’s cultural heritage.

Cross Section
Palatium Stúdió; Woods Bagot; Ken Wong; Marc Mimram; Warren Techentin; Makiko Tsukada; Peter Wenham; Coop Himmelb(l)au; Theo Deutinger; Yuusuke Karasawa; MJosé van Hee; A69; Search

Perspective: ‘We build too much too fast’
• Open Architecture in Beijing: Li Hu would like architects to reconsider the concepts their cities are built on
• Atelier Liu Yuyang Architects in Shanghai: Liu Yuyang talks about the urban development of Shanghai and the principle of China’s urbanization
• Li Xiaodong Atelier, Beijing: Li Xiaodong doesn’t think that high-rises and organically shaped museums is the way for Chinese architecture to move ahead
• Jiakun Architects in Chengdu: Liu Jiakun has found a way to deal with the lack of craftsmanship in the construction industry

Long Section
• Architectuurstudio HH in Utrecht, The Netherlands: Those who are not put off by the outer appearance of the new music palace will find a temptation-filled temple inside
• Neutelings Riedijk Architects in Amersfoort, The Netherlands: The architects wrapped a cultural centre in an undisguised reference to George, the city’s patron saint
• Groupies in Venice, Italy: Our reporters explore group dynamic, team spirit, social interaction and politics at the Architecture Biennale
• Zaha Hadid Architects in Honk Kong, China: The starchitect’s Innovation Tower provides its students something of the subtlety and complexity of a natural landscape
• Adamo-Faiden Architects in Buenos Aires, Argentina: Sebastián Adamo and Marcelo Faiden aim for an architecture that is rooted in society while also producing friction
• Guedes Cruz Architects in Alcadideche, Portugal: A retirement home for former bank employees that might resemble a series of mausoleums
• Searching for Masahiro Ikeda in Japan: Sergio Pirrone looks for the genius structural engineer behind Japan’s experimental architecture of the previous decade
• Studio Odile Decq in Lyon, France: The architect’s latest office building takes its cues from steel-truss bridges and cranes
• MBA/S in Stuttgart, Germany: The first house in the country to be built out of thermally insulating concrete
• Aaron Betsky in Cincinatti, USA: The way we live in books can be as vivid as the way we live in physical structures

Some articles from this issue

 

Out Now: Mark #51 – Aug/Sep 2014

In Mark #51, we interviewed four Chinese architects on four aspects of China’s building practices.

Mark 50

Mark 50

In early February, Mark announced an open competition for a cover design to celebrate the magazine’s 50th issue. No fewer than 540 entries from 48 countries made it anything but easy to single out the best proposal.

Cross Section
Ad Artis Architects; Suppose Design Office; Vehovar & Jauslin Architektur; OMA; Crab Studio; Adam Stockhausen; Kochi Architect's Studio; Reiulf Ramstad Architekter; Theo Deutinger; Atelier ChanChan; Casagrande Laboratory; Futurelab; Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates; Riegel Riewe Architects; Studioninedots

Perspective: Mark 50
• Cover Competition: Jury report
Mark’s 50th Bake Off: Three architects were so kind to design us a birthday cake: Maixner Schlüter Wendt Architecten | Wiel Arets Architects | Atelier Vens Vanbelle
• A Concise History of Mark
• Reality Check 1: Spain
• Reality Check 2: China

Long Section
• Unsangdong Architects in Seoul: Two new projects help to regenerate their surroundings
• Architecture Brio in Mumbai: Testing the frontiers of practicality to build a weekend home
• Álvaro Andrade in Portugal: Rowing centre boasts the singular strokes of the School of Porto
• Leonardo Portus in Chile: Using detailed architectural models to construct alternate realities
• Jun Igarashi in Japan: The architect sees very little difference between his two recently completed houses
• Morphosis in Los Angeles: Building a vertical campus for an outpost of Boston-based Emerson College
• Stephen Holl Architects in Glasgow: The new building for the Glasgow School of Art forms a striking contrast to the Mackintosh School of Architecture
• Richard Weston in the UK: Obsessed with the colours and patterns of minerals
• Mamm Design in Amsterdam: Inserting a bit of Japan into an Amsterdam apartment
• Hans van Heeswijk: Architecture books are useful when they contain plans and drawings

Some articles from this issue

 

Mark Celebrates 50 Issues

On Wednesday 11 June 2014, Mark magazine celebrated 50 issues since its debut in December 2005.

 

Out Now: Mark #50 – Jun/Jul 2014

In early February, Mark announced an open competition for a cover design to celebrate the magazine’s 50th issue.