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Brick-clad Bayford Mews by pH+ weaves itself into the urban fabric

LONDON – Eccentricity is toned down and replaced by order and ingenuity in the design of Bayford Mews, a three-unit residential building.

 

Apollo Architects confronts the public and private sides of residential living with ACRO

CHIBA – The new residence in Chiba defies housing stereotypes and lands like an unidentified architectural object on the hillside residential neighbourhood.

 

Bornstein Lyckefors designs a little cube on the prairie

KÄRNA – Späckhuggaren, a one-and-a-half storey residence, displays honest construction methods and Falu-red coloured cladding.

 

A new Montreal super-hospital saves the day

MONTREAL – After nearly a decade of work on the project, Montreal hosts a new super-hospital designed by Cannon Design and NEUF architectes.

 

Mark A-to-Z: Q is for Quebec

Cover up and put your snow boots on. Here are five projects highlighting Quebec’s appeal.

 

Platinium by Tetrarc has a heart of gold and a silver skin

MONTPELLIER – Tetrarc completes Platinium, a residential block, that uses bold metallic and reflective features to make an impact on the neighbourhood.

Out Now: Mark #69
Out Now: Mark #69

Cinema

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Pavilion of Reflections by Tom Emerson's ETH students. Photo Studio Tom Emerson
 

Mark A-to-Z: P is for Pavilion

Intricate temporary structures designed by students to practical extensions produced by starchitects, pavilions never cease to impress us with the broad spectrum of what makes architecture.

Alesia Cinema by Manuelle Gautrand Architecture. Photos Luc Boegly / Guillame Guerin
 

Manuelle Gautrand uses steps and folds to immerse the audience with film

PARIS – Wedged between a seven-storey apartment building and a low-rise retail arcade the Gaumont Alésia Cinema has been through multiple changes since its opening in 1921.

Current Issue

Mark 69

Mark 69

It’s the height of the summer and we’ve got a shiny new issue of Mark to tickle your fancy on a warm, sunny afternoon. Issue #69 travels to Beirut to check out some of the latest projects to be completed in the Lebanese capital. Bernard Khoury’s residential complex – Plot #1282 – is our cover feature and has all the makings of a ghost ship. Elsewhere, Herzog & de Meuron’s high-rise apartments comprises 26 storeys of thin, stacked slabs, and Youssef Tohme has completed two heavy, concrete villas on the city’s outskirts.

We speak to Lisbon-based architect Aires Mateus – the studio of two brothers – about their latest project in Tournai, Belgium. The brief called for the construction of a new university campus with two limitations: time and money. The contemporary building that resulted not only relates to its existing surroundings but uses archetypal volumes to craft a foyer that provides a new multifunctional space for its students.

C.F Møller’s Copenhagen International School is next on the radar for Mark #69. Rising from the industrial district on Nordhavn’s waterfront, the campus accommodates students from ages 5 to 18. The building’s tiled façade is a pixelated skin of blue solar panels angled in four different directions. Says the architect: ‘We didn’t even consider using traditional-coloured cells. It would be gloomy if they were grey or black.’

In other news: Office KGDV’s Solo House runs rings around its natural surroundings; a tower in Pratteln, Switzerland, protects its residents from the noise of the nearby railway; and cultural critic and theorist Mark Cousins talks to Mark about the role of history, theory and criticism in architecture – and why he believes that the purpose in life is a book.

Some articles from this issue

Elgtarn Tower by Ram Arkitektur. Photos Sam Hughes
 

Beds cantilever into the wild in Ram Arkitektur's log tower

ESPEDALEN – The tower provides accommodation in its most basic form, stripping back to the bare bones of hospitality with neither running water nor electricity.

Beirut Towers by Herzog & de Meuron. Photos Iwan Baan
 

Herzog & de Meuron builds a tower of vertically layered luxury apartments

BEIRUT – A tower of stacked concrete plates breaks the rule of faceless apartment blocks that are being erected as part of the city’s masterplan to rejuvenate the area.

Austria

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Mill 24 by Caramel Architects. Photos Hertha Hurnaus
 

Caramel Architects squeezes a complete living experience into a roof space

VIENNA – For quite some time, residents in the Austrian capital have relied on the ability to extend their townhouses vertically, converting roof space into extra quarters for living.

 

Mark A-to-Z: T is for Timber

There are ample good reasons to build in timber. As well as its aesthetic qualities, it is one of the most sustainable resources available to the industry.

Out Now: Mark #69
Out Now: Mark #69

Aluminium

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INET School by AZC and MSA. Photo Sergio Grazia
 

INET School by AZC and Michel Spitz shows off its smooth curves

STRASBOURG – Two seamless and smooth volumes are stacked one on top of the other, distinguishing themselves as a public mixed-use building at the corner of a busy crossroad.

Tower of Power by Göbl Architektur. Photos Bruno Klomfar
 

Göbl Architektur installs a self-sufficient power source for electric vehicles

VIENNA – The Tower of Power is a direct consequence of contemporary society's increased interest in electric vehicles.

Offices by Brenac & Gonzalez. Photos Sergio Grazia / Stefan Tuchila
 

Brenac & Gonzalez et Associés personifies three urban objects with a strong identity

PARIS – Three metallic offices adhere to an underlying theme, with elevations clad in repeated patterns of aluminium and stainless steel.

Megalithic Museum by CVDB Arquitectos. Photos Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
 

CVDB repurposes a train station as a home for stones

MORA – A disused train station and accompanying warehouse have been renovated into a museum for megaliths and prehistoric monuments in central Portugal.

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