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Mark A-to-Z: Y is for Your Choice

It's time to look back on 2017 with your top picks of Mark web articles.

 

Mark A-to-Z: X is for XXX

AMSTERDAM – Get your head out of the gutter and let Mark take you around the lovely city of Amsterdam – home to Frame Publishers.

 

Mark A-to-Z: X is for XXX

 

Out Now: Mark #71 – Dec 2017 / Jan 2018

Getting ready for the holiday shopping list? Maybe the new issue of Mark can have a special place under the Christmas tree.

 

Villa X by Barcode Architects marks the spot

BRABANT – Barcode Architects brings simplicity, material quality, and a contemporary appearance to a villa in Brabant, the Netherlands.

 

Elizabeth de Portzamparc fashions a glass toga on the Musée de la Romanité

NÎMES – The Musée de la Romanité, designed by Elizabeth de Portzamparc, shimmers in the light as it faces the exceptional piece of history embedded in the city – the Arenas …

 

Mark A-to-Z: W is for Windows

‘When one door closes, a window opens,’ goes the saying.

 

Mark A-to-Z: W is for Windows

Holiday Sale
Holiday Sale

Current Issue

Mark 71

Mark 71

Getting ready for the holiday shopping list? How about a set of Lego bricks? Or maybe the new issue of Mark can have a special place under the Christmas tree. BIG’s long-standing dream of building the Lego House in Billund comes true with photos by Iwan Baan as the cover project of issue #71. Don’t be fooled though, because the genius of Lego is that it isn’t a toy, but more like a tool that allows you to fabricate your own world.

This latest issue takes us to Shenzhen to check out some of the latest projects to be completed in the Chinese city nearby Hong Kong. With the Sea World Culture and Arts Center, Maki and Associates adds an important cultural space to Shenzhen’s waterfront. Elsewhere, the architects of the Shenzhen-based firm Urbanus added a new typology to Chinese urban landscapes: an urban village on the roof of a conventional mall.

Heatherwick Studio shows us the art of reinvention with the conversion of a decommissioned grain silo in Cape Town. The imposing silo has been turned into an art gallery with a hotel. Awestruck by the sheer magnitude of Heatherwick’s architectural accomplishment, we’re left with nagging questions about how works of art can compete with the building’s utterly compelling transformation.

In other news: Brooks + Scarpa designed a museum that’s dominated by its sculptural roof; COBE transforms a former grain silo in Copenhagen into 38 unique apartments clad in galvanized steel; we speak to Alezander Rieck about the place of the printed word in a digitized world in this issue’s Bookmark; an interconnected residence by Jakob + MacFarlane marries technology with its green surroundings.

Some articles from this issue

Lighting

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Solid Concrete by ASWA. Photos Ketsiree Wongwan
 

ASWA proves it’s what’s inside that counts

BANGKOK – The client, a Thai artist, preferred privacy in the lively neighbourhood and the architects delivered just that.

Vendsyssel Theatre by Schmidt Hammer Lassen. Photos Adam Mørk
 

Schmidt Hammer Lassen's composition of cubes opens visual connections

HJØRRING – Vendsyssel Theatre is already famous as ‘Denmark’s first newly-built theatre in over a century (outside of Copenhagen).'

Out now: Mark #71
Out now: Mark #71

White & Bright

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FOM University by J Mayer H. Photo David Franck & Patricia Parinejad
 

J. Mayer H. completes a university building imbued with mobility

DÜSSELDORF – The curvy design plays out not only as a fluid visual feed but enforces the suggested movement of students rushing through to lectures and courses.

La Barquière by Pietri Architectes. Photo Mathieu Ducros
 

La Barquière by Pietri Architectes acts like two sides of the same coin

MARSEILLE – Pietri Architectes follows a motto of ‘romantic rationalism’ and this is duly noted in this project in Marseille. Seductive curves and a shining enamelled façade …

House in Ohue by Daisuke Hanamoto. Photo Kenji Masunaga
 

Daisaku Hanamoto’s house mingles with its surroundings

KURE – Mindful of its place amongst the vernacular, the house easily blends into the residential neighbourhood.

Minima | Maxima by Marc Fornes, THEVERYMANY. Photo NAARO
 

Marc Fornes equates a minimal structure to maximum fun

ASTANA – Minima | Maxima by Marc Fornes, from THEVERYMANY, defies gravity and leaves us contemplating and dreaming.

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